FlowersLib Logo

Elevate Your Garden with Neofinetia falcata: A Pint-Sized Floral Wonder

The Neofinetia falcata, a petite plant, reaches heights of 8-10 centimeters. Its stem, 1-4 centimeters long and slightly flattened, is enveloped by leaf sheaths. The leaves, thick and leathery, are narrow and shaped like slender crescent blades. The raceme, roughly 1 centimeter long, boasts 2-5 fragrant white flowers. Petals are reversed lanceolate or nearly spoon-shaped, […]

The Neofinetia falcata, a petite plant, reaches heights of 8-10 centimeters. Its stem, 1-4 centimeters long and slightly flattened, is enveloped by leaf sheaths. The leaves, thick and leathery, are narrow and shaped like slender crescent blades.

The raceme, roughly 1 centimeter long, boasts 2-5 fragrant white flowers. Petals are reversed lanceolate or nearly spoon-shaped, measuring 8-10 millimeters long and 2.2-3 millimeters wide, with blunt tips and three veins.

The lip petal is fleshy and trifurcated, blossoming in April. It grows on tree trunks in mountain forests at elevations up to 1520 meters, found in China, Japan, and the southern Korean Peninsula, and is cultivated.

Neofinetia falcata

The entire plant or pseudobulbs are used to clear heat and benefit the throat, activate blood circulation, and alleviate pain. They are primarily used for lung heat cough, sore throat, hernia, and injuries from falls or blows.

I. Morphological Characteristics

The Anomatheca plant stands 8-10 centimeters tall with a stem length of 1-4 centimeters, slightly flattened and covered by leaf sheaths.

The leaves are thick, leathery, and narrow, resembling elongated crescent blades, measuring 5-12 centimeters in length and 7-10 millimeters in width, with tips nearly acute and bases having overlapping V-shaped sheaths.

Neofinetia falcata

The raceme is about 1 centimeter long with 2-3 (up to 5) flowers; bracts are ovate-lanceolate, 7-9 millimeters long, tapering to a point. The pedicel and ovary are 2.8-5 centimeters long with five ribs.

The flowers are white and fragrant; the median sepal is nearly obovate, 8-10 millimeters long and 2.5-4 millimeters wide, with a blunt tip and three veins.

The lateral sepals fork forward, similar in size to the median sepal, with the upper half curving outward and a keel-like ridge near the tip of the back midrib.

Neofinetia falcata

Petals are reversed lanceolate or nearly spoon-shaped, 8-10 millimeters long, and 2.2-3 millimeters wide, with blunt tips and three veins.

The lip petal is fleshy and trifurcated; the side lobes are oblong, 3.5-4 millimeters long and 0.8-1 millimeter wide, with blunt tips; the middle lobe is tongue-shaped, 7-8 millimeters long and 2-2.5 millimeters wide, with a blunt and notched tip and a triangular callus at the base, featuring three slightly raised ridges.

The spur is slender, curved, 3.5-5 centimeters long, 1.5-2 millimeters thick, with a slightly blunt tip. The column is about 2 millimeters long, with the column wings expanded into a triangular shape at the upper part.

The anther cap is white with brown sides, narrowing to a triangular shape at the front. The flowering period is in April.

II. Distribution Range

It inhabits tree trunks in mountain forests at altitudes of up to 1520 meters. It is found in Japan and the southern part of the Korean Peninsula. The type specimen was collected from Japan.

III. Growth Environment

Orchids generally grow on mountain flanks and valley walls in secluded mountain valleys, on inclined slopes with good water permeability and retention, or in crevices amid sparse mountain grass next to secondary mixed forests in the shade.

They thrive in environments with shading, short sun exposure, or only dappled light. They prefer areas with high air humidity and good air circulation and are sometimes found on cliffs above mountain streams.

Orchids should be planted in an environment with good air circulation. They favor shade, avoid direct sunlight, prefer moisture, and dislike dryness, with optimal growth temperatures between 15°C to 30°C.

Temperatures above 35°C hinder their growth. Extreme cold below 5°C affects their vigor, often leading to a dormant state. If the temperature is too high coupled with sun exposure, the leaves can scorch or wither within a day or two.

If it gets too cold without being moved indoors in time, frost damage can occur. Orchids, with their fleshy roots, are suited for sandy loamy soil rich in humus with excellent drainage.

Leaf mold or humus-rich mountain soil should be used. Slightly acidic loose soil or soil containing iron, with a pH of 5.5-6.5, is preferred.

IV. Growth and Propagation

Propagation and division are best done in both spring and fall, generally every three years. Plants that are robust and have dense pseudobulbs are suitable for division, ensuring at least five connected pseudobulbs are retained per clump.

Before dividing, reduce watering to dry out the soil. When repotting after division, cover the drainage holes with broken pottery shards, then a layer of coarse gravel, filling one-fifth to one-quarter of the pot’s depth.

Add a layer of coarse sand and a small amount of fine soil, followed by loamy soil rich in humus for planting. Plant the pseudobulbs just below the surface, leaving a margin of 2 centimeters at the rim of the pot.

Top with moss or fine gravel, water thoroughly, and place in the shade for 10-15 days, keeping the soil moist. Gradually reduce watering and proceed with normal care.

V. Disease and Pest Control

Sheath Rust

Typically, small blisters containing yellow, orange, rust-colored, or even purple-black powdery spores appear on both sides of the leaves and less frequently on the stems.

Rust is not fatal and leaves will not die, but it weakens plant growth. To control, remove affected leaves and spray with a 500-600 times diluted solution of 65% zinc dimethyldithiocarbamate or a copper-containing fungicide.

White Mold

Common during damp, rainy seasons. Initially, the base of the leaves is covered with white mycelium, leading to rhizome rot. For control, remove the infected soil and sprinkle with quintozene or lime.

For eradication, ensure good ventilation and light penetration, and well-drained soil. Severely infected plants should be destroyed.

Anthracnose

Present throughout the year but rampant during warm and rainy seasons, particularly affecting Cymbidium orchids.

The disease starts at the leaf tips and extends towards the rhizomes, initially brown then expanding and multiplying with many dry black spots, leading to plant death if severe.

For control, besides improving environmental conditions, spray with a 800-1500 times diluted solution of 50% methyl thiophanate wettable powder every 7-10 days, followed by 1% Bordeaux mixture biweekly, for 3-5 consecutive applications.

Scale Insects

Commonly known as “orchid lice,” they reproduce fastest in warm, humid conditions with poor air circulation.

Control by spraying with 1% diazinon or a 1500 times diluted solution of 50% malathion during the hatching period. If there are few pots, they can also be manually removed.

VI. Plant Culture

Orchids have had a profound impact on social life and cultural arts. Parents name their children after orchids to convey affection, painters depict orchids to symbolize ideals, and poets compose verses about orchids to express aspiration.

The image and character of orchids have deeply resonated with people, subtly influencing them.

VII. Main Values

The whole plant or pseudobulbs: Clears heat and soothes the throat; activates blood circulation and relieves pain. Used for lung heat with cough, sore throat, hernia, and injuries from falls and blows.

Share is Caring.
Peggie

Peggie

Founder of FlowersLib

Peggie was once a high school mathematics teacher, but she set aside her chalkboard and textbooks to follow her lifelong passion for flowers. After years of dedication and learning, she not only established a thriving flower shop but also founded this blog, “Flowers Library”. If you have any questions or wish to learn more about flowers, feel free to contact Peggie.

Before you go
You May Also Like
We picked them just for you. Keep reading and learn more!
© 2024 FlowersLib.com. All rights reserved.