17 Flowers That Start With I

1. Ice Begonia

The Ice Begonia is a variety of lotus. A perennial aquatic herb, it features a horizontally growing, thick, swollen rhizome with numerous longitudinal air ducts and adventitious roots underneath. Its round, shield-shaped leaves have slightly wavy edges, a smooth top surface dusted with white powder, and a stout, cylindrical, hollow petiole.

Ice Begonia

The begonia’s double flowers consist of about 90 petals and are bowl-shaped. The flower buds are green and round like a peach. The flowers are yellow, with the inner wheel featuring green petal variations.

As an aquatic plant, it thrives in relatively stable shallow water, lakes, swamps, wetlands, and ponds. It loves sunlight and requires full light exposure during its growth period. It cannot tolerate shade and will exhibit a strong phototropism when grown in semi-shade. This artificially cultivated variety is widely used for ornamental purposes in parks and courtyards.

2. Impatiens Balsamina

Impatiens Balsamina

The Impatiens Balsamina, or garden balsam, is an annual herbaceous plant of the balsam family. It stands 60-100 cm tall. Its stem is robust, fleshy, and upright. The leaves are alternately arranged; the lowest sometimes appear in pairs.

The leaf blades are lanceolate, narrowly elliptical, or inversely lanceolate. The flowers are either solitary or clustered 2-3 in the leaf axils, and come in white, pink, or purple, single or double. The fruit is broadly spindle-shaped, and the seeds are spherical and dark brown. The flowering period is from July to October.

Originally from China, India, and Malaysia, the garden balsam is primarily found in the tropical and subtropical areas of Asia and Africa, with a few species in Europe, temperate Asia, and North America. Its most valuable species grow in cold regions like the Tibetan Plateau.

In the Chifeng area, there is an excellent variety called the Buddha’s Top Bead. The garden balsam loves sunlight, is heat-tolerant, frost-sensitive, and prefers loose, fertile soil. It is hardy and can grow in poor soil.

The garden balsam is a common flower in front gardens and is suitable for pot cultivation. It has a cool nature and a sweet-bitter taste, with properties that expel wind, remove dampness, activate blood circulation, and relieve pain.

It contains a natural red-brown pigment and can be used as a natural dye. Indians use it for body painting, and red petals crushed with alum can dye fingernails.

3. Impatiens Hawkeri

Impatiens Hawkeri

The New Guinea Impatiens Hawkeri is a perennial herbaceous plant from the Balsaminaceae family, standing at 20-30 cm tall. Its stem is fleshy and smooth, green or reddish-brown, with prominent nodes that can easily break.

The leaves are mostly whorled, lanceolate, with sharp serrations on the leaf margins. Leaf color ranges from yellow-green to deep green; the color of the veins and stem often correlates with flower color.

Flowers are borne singly in leaf axils, with the base petals transformed into a spur. Flower colors are very rich, including magenta, blue, white, purple, orange, etc.; blooming period is from June to August.

Impatiens Hawkeri


The plant is native to New Guinea. It thrives in warm and well-lit environments, is not cold-resistant, dislikes intense sunlight, and favors deep, fertile, well-drained soil. The primary propagation methods are seeding, tissue culture, and cutting.

The New Guinea Impatiens has a rich array of colors and a long flowering period, making it an excellent ornamental herb. Besides pot cultivation for indoor decoration, it can also be planted along garden paths, forest edges, rocky hillsides, or in grass fields for viewing. The flower language of the New Guinea Impatiens is “Don’t touch me” and “Remembering the past

4. Impatiens Walleriana

Impatiens Walleriana

The African Impatiens Walleriana is a perennial herbaceous plant from the Balsaminaceae family. It grows to 30-70 cm tall. The stem is upright, green or light red; leaves are alternate or arranged spirally at the top, the leaf blade is broadly elliptical or ovate to oblong-elliptical, with a pointed tip.

The inflorescence is axillary, usually with two flowers that vary greatly in size and color; the capsule is spindle-shaped, hairless; flowering period is from June to October.It is native to Africa, and has been widely introduced and cultivated around the world.

Impatiens Walleriana

The plant prefers warm, ventilated environments, is not cold-resistant, prefers semi-shade, and grows best in well-drained humus soil. Its natural propagation method is through seeds, but it can also be propagated by cutting.

The African Impatiens has a rich array of flower colors, vibrant and cheerful hues, a full and rounded plant shape, and a particularly long flowering period.The roots, leaves, and seeds of the Impatiens can be used for medicinal purposes, warm in nature, sweet and slightly bitter, and need to be dried.

5. Incarvillea Arguta

Incarvillea Arguta

The African Impatiens Walleriana is a perennial herbaceous plant from the Balsaminaceae family. It grows to 30-70 cm tall. The stem is upright, green or light red; leaves are alternate or arranged spirally at the top, the leaf blade is broadly elliptical or ovate to oblong-elliptical, with a pointed tip.

The inflorescence is axillary, usually with two flowers that vary greatly in size and color; the capsule is spindle-shaped, hairless; flowering period is from June to October.It is native to Africa, and has been widely introduced and cultivated around the world.

The plant prefers warm, ventilated environments, is not cold-resistant, prefers semi-shade, and grows best in well-drained humus soil. Its natural propagation method is through seeds, but it can also be propagated by cutting.

The African Impatiens has a rich array of flower colors, vibrant and cheerful hues, a full and rounded plant shape, and a particularly long flowering period.The roots, leaves, and seeds of the Impatiens can be used for medicinal purposes, warm in nature, sweet and slightly bitter, and need to be dried.

6. Indigofera Kirilowii

Indigofera Kirilowii

Indigofera Kirilowii, also known as the Chinese Indigo, is a small shrub from the Fabaceae family. The plant can grow between 0.3 to 1 meter in height. Its stem is cylindrical, with young branches having edges. The plant is sparsely covered with white cruciform hairs on the leaf axis, both sides of the leaf, and the inflorescence.

The leaves are opposite, broad ovate, rhomboid ovate, or elliptical, with a rounded or acute apex, and a cuneate or broad-cuneate base. The underside of the leaves is powdery green, with conspicuous lateral veins.

The inflorescence is a raceme with sparse flowers, having a cup-shaped calyx and lanceolate triangular calyx teeth. The flowers are pale pink, rarely white, with elliptical standard petals. The fruit is cylindrical and the seeds are reddish-brown and oblong. The flowering period is from May to July, and the fruiting period is in August.

Indigofera Kirilowii

The Chinese Indigo is found in many provinces of China, and is also found in Korea, Japan, and other countries. It often grows in shrublands and sparse forests on hillsides or in rock crevices. It prefers a climate with plenty of sunlight and is relatively tolerant of poor and dry conditions. The plant propagates through seeding, cutting, division, and layering.

The Chinese Indigo has a bitter taste and cold properties. It has anti-inflammatory, analgesic, heat-clearing, detoxifying, laxative, and throat-soothing effects. It can be used to treat throat inflammation, lung heat cough, constipation due to heat, hemorrhoids, and jaundice. Its stem bark fiber can be used to produce artificial cotton, fiberboard, and paper.

The branches can be used to make baskets, the seeds contain oil and starch, and the leaves contain tannins. The Chinese Indigo has bright, pale pink flowers that are abundant and fragrant, and its dense branches and leaves make it a good source of nectar and an excellent landscaping plant.

The flower buds can also be eaten. Its flower language represents loveliness, warmth, delicacy, youth, and brightness.

7. Inula Japonica

Inula Japonica

Inula Japonica, also known as the Japanese Inula, is a plant of the Asteraceae family. The stem is covered with long hairs, or it is glabrous at the lower part. The middle leaves are oblong, lanceolate, or oblanceolate, often with round semi-amplexicaul ears at the base and are sessile.

The upper leaves are linear-lanceolate. The inflorescence is a loosely umbellate corymb, with long and thin peduncles and yellow ligulate flowers. The achenes are cylindrical and covered with sparse hairs. The flowering period is from June to October, and the fruiting period is from September to November.

The Japanese Inula originated in many provinces of China and is also found in Mongolia, Korea, Siberia in Russia, and Japan. It prefers a warm and humid climate and is suitable for planting in deep, loose, and fertile sandy soil rich in organic matter. The plant mainly propagates through seeds and division.

The dried capitulum of the Japanese Inula can be used in traditional medicine. It has a bitter and pungent taste, and slight warm properties. It can be used to descend qi, eliminate phlegm, promote urination, and stop vomiting.

8. Ipomoea Cairica

The Ipomoea Cairica, also known as the Five Fingered Morning Glory, is a perennial vine from the Convolvulaceae family. With slender stems and palmate leaves, it sports a funnel-shaped corolla that is typically purple, red, or occasionally white.

Its fruit is nearly spherical, and the plant usually blooms between May and December. The name ‘Five Fingered’ comes from the leaf’s palmate shape, featuring five to seven lobes.

Originally from tropical Asia or Africa, the Five Fingered Morning Glory thrives in warm, humid, and sunny environments. It is heat and drought-resistant, but not frost tolerant.

The plant exhibits strong climbing abilities and is commonly found among mountain valley forests, hillside shrubs, and rock crevices. As a self-incompatibility plant, it generally relies on cross-pollination for seed production and vegetative propagation through its above-ground organs.

The flowers and leaves of the Five Fingered Morning Glory are highly ornamental. It can serve as a vertical greening plant, suitable for parks, gardens, walls, corridors, flower racks, green fences, and slopes.

9. Ipomoea Cholulensis

Ipomoea Cholulensis

The Ipomoea Cholulensis, known as the Orange Morning Glory, is an annual herb from the Convolvulaceae family, also referred to as the Round Leaf Morning Glory. It has smooth, twining stems and heart-shaped leaves that are sometimes deeply lobed.

The flowers, which bloom from late June to August, are orange with a yellow throat and a long, slender tube that suddenly expands at the throat. The plant produces small, spherical fruit and ovate or spherical seeds.

The Orange Morning Glory is native to South America and prefers slightly moist soil conditions. It is somewhat drought-resistant and thrives in sunny environments. It does not tolerate shade or frost. As winter approaches, the plant begins to turn yellow and eventually dies.

Propagation is by seed, usually starting in April each year. The Orange Morning Glory is suitable for ground planting and serves as an ornamental plant for windows, balconies, fences, and trellises, providing excellent vertical greening.

10. Ipomoea Nil

Ipomoea Nil

The Ipomoea Nil, a species of the morning glory family, is an annual herbaceous plant. Its stems are twining; leaves are broadly ovate to round, tapering at the tip and heart-shaped at the base; flower clusters grow in the axils, with the corolla being blue-violet or purplish-red and hairless; the capsule is nearly spherical; seeds are egg-shaped and trihedral, black-brown or milky yellow, covered with brown short velvety hairs; flowering period is from June to September; fruiting period is from September to October.

Originally from tropical America, it is now widely grown in tropical and subtropical regions. Currently, it is distributed in most parts of China, except for some areas in the northwest and northeast.

The Ipomoea Nil is a sun-loving plant, fond of light, moisture, and warmth. It is not cold-resistant but can withstand arid and barren conditions, and low temperatures. Propagation is primarily through seeding.

Ipomoea Nil

The Ipomoea Nil tastes bitter and cold and is poisonous. Its medicinal properties include diuretic, expectorant, and vermifuge effects; it can be used to treat swelling, fullness, coughing and wheezing due to qi stagnation, and abdominal pain due to parasites.

The Ipomoea Nil is a common creeping flower in summer and autumn, suitable for small courtyards and indoor windows for shade, beautifying small trellises, and can also be used as ground cover.

11. Ipomoea Quamoclit

Ipomoea Quamoclit

Ipomoea Quamoclit, a part of the Convolvulaceae family and sweet potato genus, is a type of annual, tender, twisting herbaceous plant. Its leaves are oval or oblong, deeply lobed to the midvein with false stipules often at the base.

The inflorescence is axillary, consisting of a few flowers in a corymbose formation. The flowers stand upright with the flower stalks longer than the sepals, thickening into a rod shape when fruiting.

The sepals are green, oval to oblong-spatulate, blunt at the tip with a small protruding point. The deep red corolla is salverform and hairless. The capsule is ovate, with the septum persistent and transparent. The seeds are oval-oblong and dark brown.

Ipomoea Quamoclit

The flowering period is from July to September, and the fruiting period is from September to October. Ipomoea Quamoclit, named for its bird-feather-like leaves and climbing nature, is native to tropical America but now widely distributed globally.

Ipomoea Quamoclit prefers warm, sun-facing environments, is frost-resistant, drought-tolerant and thrives in sandy, fertile, and moist soil, but also tolerates poor soil. Its propagation method is by seed.

In terms of medicinal value, Ipomoea Quamoclit has the effects of clearing heat and detoxifying, expelling wind and dampness, activating tendons and collaterals, and cooling blood to stop dysentery.

12. Iris Germanica

Iris Germanica

The Iris Germanica, also known as the German Iris, belongs to the Iris family. It has a robust rhizome, flattened and circular in shape, with ring markings. The leaves are green to greyish green, powdered, and lack a midrib.

The flower bud is grassy, green, with membranous edges, sometimes tinted with a hint of red-purple, encasing a vibrant bloom. The capsule fruit is trihedral cylindrical; the seeds are pear-shaped, with a yellowish-white appendage at the top. The blooming period is from April to May, and the fruiting period is from June to August.

Iris Germanica

Originally from Central and Southern Europe, the German Iris is cultivated throughout China. It thrives in sunny, cool climates, demonstrating strong cold resistance. It can also tolerate semi-shade conditions, but it is not suitable as a ground cover plant for dense forests. The typical methods of propagation include division and seeding.

The German Iris has medicinal properties, including diuretic, laxative, expectorant, and emetic effects. It is mainly used to treat symptoms such as edema, liver cancer gas, dry cough, sore throat, and gastrointestinal bloating. However, excessive consumption can cause symptoms of nausea and vomiting. The flower language of the German Iris is “elegance”.

13. Iris Japonica

Iris Japonica

The Iris Japonica, also known as butterfly flower, is a perennial herbaceous plant from the Iris family, growing to a height of 40-60 centimeters. It has horizontally growing rhizomes and sword-shaped leaves that taper at the end, all originating from the plant’s base.

The flower stem surpasses the leaves, and the flowers, which are pale purple or blue-violet, are arranged in a loosely scattered umbel. The fruit is elliptical with irregularly shaped, dark brown seeds. The blooming period is from March to April, with the fruiting period from May to June.

Originally from China, the butterfly flower also grows in Japan. It’s commonly found on shady, moist grasslands, sparse forests, or at the edge of forests. It’s shade-tolerant and cold-hardy, preferring moist, well-drained soil.

It reproduces naturally by seed, but can also be propagated by division or sowing. The plant grows in spring, summer, and fall, and becomes dormant in winter.

Iris Japonica

The butterfly flower has medicinal properties including reducing swelling, detoxifying, and relieving pain. It can be used to treat conditions such as hepatitis, liver swelling, liver pain, throat pain, and stomach diseases.

Modern medical research has shown that its decoction inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and Octomitus, and has a significant antipyretic effect. Also known as duck’s foot grass, the butterfly flower is traditionally eaten in some cultures.

The tender stems and leaves can be harvested in spring to make soup or stir-fry dishes, or dried for later use. In addition to these uses, the beautiful flowers and leaves of the butterfly flower make it an excellent choice for ornamental cultivation.

14. Iris Nigricans

Iris Nigricans

Iris Nigricans, also known as the Black Iris, is a perennial herbaceous plant from the Iris family. The plant stands at a height of 35 centimeters, with a robust rhizome that bifurcates. The leaves, yellow-green in hue, are slightly curved and broader in the middle, taking on a broad sword shape.

The flower stems are smooth, and the flowers, reminiscent of orchids, are a deep purple bordering on black. With their glossy sheen, each petal displays the deepest black, speckled with dark velvet spots, shimmering amidst the desert wind. The petals are textured, with clear lines and delicate, transparent veins.

The Black Iris thrives in well-drained, sun-soaked locations. For outdoor planting, mix some dolomitic limestone into well-drained sandy soil for neutralization. From the time of planting until February, the plant requires a cold treatment.

For potted plants, avoid water shortage and ensure thorough watering each day after sprouting. Once the leaves wither, stop watering and place the flower pot in a cool place to hibernate. Liquid fertilizer should be applied appropriately during the growing period.

The Black Iris holds tremendous ornamental value. At the end of the rainy season, around March or April, the deep purple, almost black iris blooms across Jordan, captivating tourists from all corners of the globe.

15. Iris Tectorum

Iris Tectorum

The Iris Tectorum, a perennial herbaceous plant belonging to the Iris family, boasts a robust rhizome. Its flowers are a beautiful blue-purple color, the upper part swelling into a trumpet shape, and the outer flower lobes are round or broad ovate.

The plant’s base leaves are a yellow-green color, slightly curved and shaped like a broad sword. Its capsule fruit takes the form of a long ellipse or inverted ovate, and the seeds are a dark brown, pear-shaped. The Iris Tectorum blooms from April to May, bearing fruit from June to August. The Iris gets its name from its petals, which are shaped like the tail of a kite.

Native to central China and Japan, the Iris Tectorum is mainly distributed in the northern temperate zones worldwide. It thrives in environments with abundant sunlight and cool climate.

Iris Tectorum

It is cold-resistant, prefers moderate moisture, and grows best in well-drained, humus-rich, slightly alkaline and sticky limestone soils. It’s often found in marshy soils or shallow water layers. The Iris Tectorum primarily propagates through division and sowing.

The Iris Tectorum has medicinal properties, such as dissolving lumps in the heart and abdomen and eliminating water dampness. It is used to treat serious infectious diseases like Gu poison and ghost sores.

The predominant color of the Iris flower is blue-purple, earning it the reputation of “Blue Enchantress”. Its delicate fragrance makes it ideal for perfume-making. In China, the Iris often symbolizes love and friendship. In the context of love, the Iris represents the messenger of love, and its floral message is one of lasting longing.

16. Iris Wilsonii

Iris Wilsonii

Iris Wilsonii, a perennial herb, has fibrous remnants of old leaves at its base. Its rhizome is thick and obliquely extended, with few branches and yellow-white roots showing shrunken transverse stripes. The leaves are basal, grey-green, and broadly strap-shaped with 3-5 inconspicuous longitudinal veins.

The hollow flower stems are 50-60 cm high, with 1-2 stem leaves; there are 3 bracts, grassy, green, lanceolate, each containing 2 flowers; the flowers are yellow, with a diameter of 6-7 cm.

Iris Wilsonii

The outer perianth segments are obovate with purplish-brown stripes and spots, and the claw part is narrowly wedge-shaped; the inner perianth segments are inverted lanceolate, leaning outward when the flower blooms.

The capsule is elliptical columnar, with 6 prominent ribs and no beak at the top; the seeds are brown, flat, and semi-circular. The flowering period is May-June, and the fruiting period is July-August.

It grows in grassy slopes, grasslands at the edge of forests, and wetlands beside rivers. It is found in Hubei, Shaanxi, Gansu, Sichuan, and Yunnan, China. This flower is cultivated and has high horticultural value.

17. Ixora Chinensis

Ixora Chinensis

Ixora Chinensis, also known as Ixora or flame of the woods, is a plant of the Rubiaceae family and Ixora genus. The plant is short, with beautiful flowers and leaves, and rich flower colors, including red, orange, yellow, white, and dual-color.

The plant form is beautiful, with dense flowering and rich colors, making it an important potted woody flower, and it is the national flower of Myanmar. In the southern part of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China, people usually call it a water hydrangea. The Ixora has a long flowering period, from March to December every year.

Ixora Chinensis

Ixora originated in southern China and Malaysia, and was introduced to the UK at the end of the 17th century, and later spread to various European countries. The plant is short, with beautiful flowers and leaves, and a variety of flower colors available all year round, including red, orange, yellow, white, and dual-color.

It is planted outdoors in southern China and is suitable for courtyards, hotels, and scenic spots. The staggered heights and bright flower colors create an excellent landscape effect, making it an important potted woody flower. It is widely used for potted ornamental purposes.

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