FlowersLib Logo

Elevate Your Garden with Corydalis pallida: Growing Tips and Secrets

The Corydalis pallida is a grayish-green, clump-forming biennial herb with a foul odor, standing 20-60 cm tall. Its stems, which may be singular or numerous, emerge from the axils of the basal leaves, are ridged, and often branch towards the upper part. Numerous basal leaves form a rosette and wither during the flowering period. Inflorescences […]

The Corydalis pallida is a grayish-green, clump-forming biennial herb with a foul odor, standing 20-60 cm tall. Its stems, which may be singular or numerous, emerge from the axils of the basal leaves, are ridged, and often branch towards the upper part.

Numerous basal leaves form a rosette and wither during the flowering period. Inflorescences are terminal and axillary, sometimes opposite the leaves, loosely bearing many flowers on peduncles of varying lengths.

The bracts are lanceolate to oblong. The flowers are yellow to pale yellow, robust, and spread out. The sepals are nearly round and centrally attached. The ovary and capsule are linear and bead-like. The seeds are shiny black and have a cap-like hilum.

Corydalis pallida

It is found throughout most regions of China, growing in conditions such as corners of walls, crevices in rocks, and grassy edges of ditches.

I. Morphological Characteristics

The original variety of the Pale Corydalis is a grayish-green, clump-forming herbaceous plant, 20-60 cm tall, with a taproot and few developed lateral roots in a whisker-like formation.

The stems are one to many, emerging from the axils of the basal leaves, ridged, and often branching in the upper part. The numerous basal leaves form a rosette that withers during the flowering season.

The cauline leaves are more densely arranged, with the lower ones petiolate and the upper nearly sessile. The upper surface of the leaves is green, the underside is pale, and they are bipinnately compound with deep divisions.

Corydalis pallida

The primary pinnae have about 4-6 pairs, short-petiolate to sessile, and the secondary pinnae are sessile, oval to oblong.

The terminal pinnae are larger, about 1.5-2 cm long and 1.2-1.5 cm wide, deeply three-lobed with rounded serrate lobes, while the lateral lobes are smaller, often with 4-5 rounded teeth.

The racemose inflorescences are terminal and axillary, sometimes opposite the leaves, around 5 cm long, loosely flowered with peduncles of various lengths. The bracts are lanceolate to oblong, with short tips, about as long as the pedicels.

The pedicels are 4-7 mm long. The sepals are nearly round, attaching centrally, about 1 mm in diameter with toothed margins. The outer petals are spoon-shaped at the apex, with short tips, and are without a crest or sometimes only the upper petals have a shallow crest.

Corydalis pallida

The upper petals are 1.7-2.3 cm long; the spur is about one-third the length of the petals, straight on the back, drooping ventrally, and slightly curved downwards.

The nectary is about two-thirds the length of the spur, with a hook-shaped end. The lower petals are about 1.4 cm long. The inner petals are about 1.3 cm long, with a crest, and the claw is about as long as the petal blade.

The stamen bundle is lanceolate. The ovary is linear with a stigma that has two horizontal arms, each ending in three papillae. The linear capsule is bead-like, 2-4 cm long and about 2 mm wide, extending obliquely to drooping, containing a single row of seeds.

The seeds are shiny black, about 2 mm in diameter, densely covered with conical protrusions, flatter in the middle; the hilum is cap-like, covering about half of the seed.

The stems are smooth and hairless. The leaves are twice to thrice pinnately compound, with the final leaflets being ovate, shallowly to deeply lobed.

The racemose inflorescence; the flowers are yellow-brown, with the upper petals extending into a rounded spur. The capsule is linear. The seeds are black and discoid. The plant has a bitter taste.

II. Growing Environment

It thrives in open forest spaces, corners of walls, rock crevices, burnt-over lands, forest edges, riverbanks, or stony slopes. It tolerates semi-shade, does not withstand high temperatures, strong sunlight, or drought, and has the ability to self-seed and propagate.

III. Distribution Range

The Pale Corydalis is distributed in the northern part of Korea, Japan, and the Far East region of Russia. The type specimen was collected from Japan.

Share is Caring.
Peggie

Peggie

Founder of FlowersLib

Peggie was once a high school mathematics teacher, but she set aside her chalkboard and textbooks to follow her lifelong passion for flowers. After years of dedication and learning, she not only established a thriving flower shop but also founded this blog, “Flowers Library”. If you have any questions or wish to learn more about flowers, feel free to contact Peggie.

Before you go
You May Also Like
We picked them just for you. Keep reading and learn more!
© 2024 FlowersLib.com. All rights reserved.