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Chrysanthemum Frutescens: All About Types, Growth & More!

The Marguerite Daisy, scientifically known as Chrysanthemum frutescens and originally known as Pyrethrum frutescens, also goes by other names such as Marguerite and French Marigold. Its natural habitat is the Canary Islands in North Africa. It thrives in cool, moist environments, is sun-loving, and does not tolerate extreme heat or waterlogged conditions. During hot summers, […]

The Marguerite Daisy, scientifically known as Chrysanthemum frutescens and originally known as Pyrethrum frutescens, also goes by other names such as Marguerite and French Marigold. Its natural habitat is the Canary Islands in North Africa. It thrives in cool, moist environments, is sun-loving, and does not tolerate extreme heat or waterlogged conditions.

During hot summers, it tends to shed leaves. It does not possess strong cold resistance; hence, it requires protection for wintering. This species prefers fertile soil with good drainage. The blooming period of Marguerite daisies is remarkably long, flowering from early spring to autumn, and it is commonly cultivated in parks or botanical gardens across China as ornamental potted plants.

Growth and Distribution

The Marguerite Daisy is originally from the Canary Islands in Africa.

Morphology and Characteristics

This shrub can grow up to one meter tall. Most of its branches are woody. The leaves are broadly ovate, elliptic, or long elliptic, measuring 3-6 cm long and 2-4 cm wide, and are bipinnately divided. Its primary division can be deeply incised or nearly completely divided, while the secondary division is shallowly incised or half-divided.

There are 2-5 pairs of primary lateral divisions, and the secondary lateral divisions are linear or lanceolate, and hairless on both sides. The leafstalks are 1.5-4 cm long, with narrow wings. The flower heads are numerous and arranged in irregular umbels at the end of the branches, with long peduncles.

The involucre is 10-15 mm wide. All the involucral bracts have white, wide, membranous edges, and the inner layer’s apices enlarge into a bract-like form. The ligule of the ray florets is 8-15 mm long.

The achene of the ray floret has three ribs with white, membranous, wide wings. The bisexual achene has 1-2 ribs with narrow wings, and there are 4-6 slender intercostal ribs. The pappus is 0.4 mm long. It flowers and bears fruit from February to October.

Habitat and Habits

Learn About The Chrysanthemum Frutescens: Basics, Types, Growth,Value and More

This species prefers cool, moist environments. It is sun-loving, does not withstand heat well, and fears waterlogged conditions.

During hot summers, it sheds leaves. It does not have a strong cold resistance, and needs protection during winter. It requires fertile soil with good drainage. However, due to the Marguerite Daisy’s ease of propagation, even cuttings of stems can survive and thrive, and it has become invasive in some areas.

Cultivation

The primary propagation method of Marguerite Daisy is through stem cuttings. Cuttings made in September or October can bloom around May Day the following year, and those made in June or July can bloom in early spring of the second year.

During propagation, robust and tender branches are cut into segments of about 5 cm to be used as cuttings. These are then planted in clean sand or perlite, watered thoroughly, and kept moist, which allows them to take root in about half a month.

After this, the plant can be transferred for pot cultivation in nutrient soil. After every five leaves grow, the plant should be topped twice to encourage bushy growth.

During the budding stage, attention should be paid to sunlight and the application of phosphorus and potassium fertilizers, otherwise, the plant may grow too tall and thin, causing it to fall over, and the flowers may be small. Aphid attacks should also be prevented.

Value and Other Uses

Learn About The Chrysanthemum Frutescens: Basics, Types, Growth,Value and More

Primary Value

Ornamental Value

Across China, this plant is often cultivated in parks or botanical gardens as ornamental potted plants for display.

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Peggie

Peggie

Founder of FlowersLib

Peggie was once a high school mathematics teacher, but she set aside her chalkboard and textbooks to follow her lifelong passion for flowers. After years of dedication and learning, she not only established a thriving flower shop but also founded this blog, “Flowers Library”. If you have any questions or wish to learn more about flowers, feel free to contact Peggie.

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